Knit, Hook and Stitch – The 28 Types of Crochet and Your Creative Adventure

Types of Crochet

Whether looking to out-knit your nan with the latest stitch trends or just wanting to test a new hobby, there are so many types of crocheting you could try.

There’s Aran and Bullion and so many more, but you’ll have to read on to know what we’re on about. As well as this, crocheting goes beyond the crochet patterns. There are things such as the different crochet stitches, the types of crochet hooks, the yarn at your local hobby store and even the history of the types of crocheting to consider.

So, if you’re here looking for tips on crochet for beginners or you’re an experienced pro at the different crochet stitches, crochet has a number of benefits ranging from improved mood and calmness to learning a new skill with movements. Crochet patterns can benefit you mentally and physically, and most certainly isn’t just a hobby for your nan!

The hardest part of your journey is knowing what you need and how to get started; that’s why the team here at The Hobby Kraze are here to save the day (and to make each stitch a little smoother).

With a little guidance, you will be picking up types of crochet hooks with new patterns to get started on that yarn bomb project in no time! But before you start, here’s what we’ll be covering in this soft and knitted guide to the types of crocheting (there are 28 you know!): 

  1. A Brief History into the Various Types of Crocheting 
  2. What are the Tools Needed for the Different Crochet Stitches? 
  3. A Beginners Guide to the Best Yarn for Your Crocheting Adventures 
  4. The Best Types of Crochet Hooks for Beginning your Crochet Journey 
  5. The 28 Types of Crocheting and Some Different Crochet Stitches 

Before we move on, you know us at The Hobby Kraze, we love a good myth buster. 

The one we want to address today in this crocheting bonanza is the elephant-coloured yarn in the room. There are so many myths around the knitting-sphere that say crocheting “eats-up” yarn. Well, nice try knitters of the world but we have discovered that this statement depends on the different crochet stitches you’re making, the size of the types of crochet hooks and the crochet patterns you’re working on.

Though, this myth-busting statement is the exact same truth for all other types of garment creation including sewing and knitting. So, if you wanted to head out into “The Ultimate Guide to Sewing” or “The Ultimate Guide to Knitting” (written by The Hobby Kraze team just for you, of course), then you’ll know they don’t have to be expensive hobbies, either. 

Or, at least, as long as you know what crochet patterns you’re trying to make, it doesn’t have to be an expensive hobby.

Now we’ve got that out of the way, we can move onto the fun part; discovering crochet for beginners, where it came from, what you need and – lastly – the 28 types of crocheting you should try at home or with friends.

A Brief History into the Various Types of Crocheting

A Brief History into the Various Types of Crocheting 

The origins of crochet are a bit of a strange one, and more of a recent craft than any other hobby we have here at The Hobby Kraze. 

In fact, it’s only a few hundred years old. 

There are a few different theories of where the practice of crochet patterns came from. For one, some believe they originated in Arabia and were taken across the world through the Arabian trade routes. Another theory suggests that South American tribesmen would crochet garments as a right of puberty. A third and final theory suggests that it was the Chinese who developed the types of crocheting because of ancient dolls that have been found using different crochet stitches. 

Moving onto the more recent practices of crocheting and it takes us down a completely different path (strangely enough). No matter where the true origins of crochet for beginners started, they reached the European continent by the 17th century with Italians and French garment makers adopting the new knitting strategy. 

The yarn trail takes us back to the embroidery practices of North Africa and the Middle East. They called it “tambouring” after the French “tambour” meaning drum. The idea was that a single hooked needle was used to thread yarn through fabric to create chain stitches. 

Then, in the early 1800s, this newly developed technique known as “shepherds knitting” was one of the later types of crocheting most resembling what we do today. It was performed using a shepherd’s hook much larger than the modern types of crochet hooks. Over time, the style of crochet patterns as well as the tools of the trade would evolve and develop into what we see today while skipping down the aisles of the craft shop. 

In fact, these changes led to the first crochet patterns produced in 1823: five new stitch processes would be used to create new purse styles for the modern lady. With this, by the mid-1800s, the practice and hobby of shepherd’s knitting became known as crochet (where the French “croc” translates to “hook”).

Since these humble roots around the world and across the famous trade lines, the art of crochet has developed into over 150 different crochet stitches (as well as the 28 different crochet stitches we’ll be discussing today!).

What are the Tools Needed for the Different Crochet Stitches?

Starting a new creative journey is always a bit daunting. Especially when you’re not too sure of what you want to make or which tools you need to be throwing into the basket.

Luckily, the team here at The Hobby Kraze have some insider knowledge to help you get from organising your workplace to not losing your stitch (A.K.A. the place in the row). And we have put together a list of essentials to get you started with the various types of crocheting:

  • Yarn
  • Embroidery Scissors
  • Stitch Markers
  • Tape Measure
  • Crochet Hooks
  • Darning Needle
  • Crochet Patterns
  • Crochet Hook Organiser
  • Row Counter
  • Block Mat
  • Yarn Organiser

Of course, not every single item here is essential; they’ll just make your crocheting life a little easier. In reality, because the team just want to make your hobby adventures fly by with the time, the only necessities in the types of crocheting are the yarn and hook. Everything else including the crochet patterns can be classed as a luxury to the trade.

Plus, another bonus to the types crocheting – and just crochet for beginners as a whole – is that they don’t require a new tool for all the new crochet patterns. In fact, you could be soon creating the rows and picking up your own yarn with your various types of crochet hooks while devising your own patterns. 

A Beginners Guide to the Best Yarn for Your Crocheting Adventures

A Beginners Guide to the Best Yarn for Your Crocheting Adventures 

Getting started with your creative journey, it’s easy to get a little woolly headed when it comes to picking your fibre type. With so much going on, it’s easy to get sucked into superficial things such as price and aesthetics. These are, of course, factors you should consider; however, the yarn you choose may not suit your projects or types of crochet hooks you decide to use.

To give an extra helping hand in picking your yarn, we’ve delved a little deeper into the four key yarns used in crochet for beginners. This way, you’ll be stitching your way from budding beginner to crochet pro in no time! 

Acrylic

First to note is the most popular choice among crochet stitchers around the world: acrylic. 

Being widely available, it can be found in almost all hobby stores and not just in one colour, either. As a synthetic fibre, it comes in a large variety of colours while still remaining affordable.

However, it’s important to keep in mind that cheap and popular doesn’t always translate to being the best choice (especially for your crochet patterns). For example, some of the lower-value acrylic yarns have a lower quality thread causing them to be prone to splitting.

Cotton

Cotton is a time-old yarn featured in nearly everything from historical garments to modern garments. It’s absorbent, harbours water-resistant properties, is breathable, is kind on the skin, is a natural material and so much more.

And while it has all these gleaming benefits, it’s not always the best option for the types of crocheting. This is because it’s renowned to be a challenging thread (especially in crochet for beginner’s patterns) due to the lack of elasticity in the thread.

Still, it’s not something you should steer clear of. It’s something you can work towards with confidence and experience with different crochet stitches. In fact, it’s said to be similar to crocheting with wool. So, it’s perfect for crochet patterns you want to hold their shape.

Wool

As mentioned, using wool for crochet can be quite similar to cotton. As another natural fibre, it is very resilient and forgiving (making them the perfect option in crochet for beginners where mistakes are everywhere). 

We’ve all been victim to starting a project only for there to be a sudden disaster such as missing a loop in the row or suddenly finding a new loop that wasn’t on the last row. Luckily, wool is easy to reuse and unravel (also known as frogging in the crochet community) which means no waste!

One thing to note if your considering using wool is potential allergies. Here at The Hobby Kraze, we take health and self-care seriously (after all, it is what hobbies are all about). So, we advise considering one of the other three types of crocheting yarns if you suspect an allergy.

Crochet Thread

Last on the list is a speciality yarn called crochet thread. 

This has to be a favourite among the team here at The Hobby kraze. Simply because it is made using cotton and acrylic fibres to provide skin kindness, strength, durability and elasticity.

As well as this, it is much finer and more delicate in appearance making it a better option for certain crochet patterns and lace items such as doilies. 

With this, crochet thread is generally something that the average beginner to crochet will work up to with time. That said, if you’ve got that creative flair for crochet and a passion to hit the ground running with the finer crochet patterns, we say go for it. 

The Best Types of Crochet Hooks for Beginning your Crochet Journey

The Best Types of Crochet Hooks for Beginning your Crochet Journey 

When you begin your journey into the various different types of crocheting, you’ll want to know the right tools of the trade to find which ones suit you. Luckily, the team here at The Hobby Kraze have done some of the hard work for you. 

The first thing to note is that there are two key types of crochet hooks that you’ll need to keep in mind: the tapered hook and the in-line hook.

Every hook begins life with a long and slender handle and a small hook at the end to help catch and pull yarn through organised loops. When the yarn is pulled through a loop, it becomes a stich and moves from the throat to the shaft of the different types of crochet hooks.

In terms of the tapered hook, the throat becomes far narrower as it reaches the head. Each aspect of the hook is very soft with no prominent edges and a very blunt head. As well as this, looking at the profile of the hook, it’s clear to see the head can ‘jut’ out from the shaft. 

At the opposite end of the spectrum are the in-line types of crochet hooks. They appear like a long shaft has been cookie-cut into a crochet hook. With this, it has sharper edges.

In-line hooks are recommended with crochet for beginner’s as they tend to be easier to maintain tension. Although, the changing shape of the tapered hook can allow the stitches to become smaller as the crochet patterns reach their edge.

However, we do suggest experimenting with all the various different sizes and shapes of hooks to allow you to progress with your different crochet stitches. For example, you might find it easier to work with an in-line hook overall, but for Amigurumi types of crocheting, you’ll want to pick up a tapered hook for the fine stitching.

Here’s a quick list of all the different types of material your newest set of crochet hooks can be made out of:

  • Acrylic
  • Bamboo
  • Clay
  • Glass
  • Metal (Aluminium)
  • Plastic
  • Wood

The 28 Types of Crocheting and Some Different Crochet Stitches

The 28 Types of Crocheting and Some Different Crochet Stitches 

Now we’re onto the 28 types of crochet, we feel it’s time to make sure you’re ready. You know the history of the different crochet stitches; you know the types of crochet hooks and you’ve got an idea of what’s in your toolkit. 

So, we wanted to make sure you’re ready by letting you know that texture and colour are the key to enjoying your crochet patterns.

Picking a smooth textured yarn will help remove the likelihood of encountering any pesky yarns and choose a light-coloured yard to help spot mistakes easier. But now, the fun part:

Amigurumi Crocheting

Amigurumi Crocheting

Originating from Japan, Amigurumi translates to knitted and stuffed doll. You’ll typically find these types of crocheting being used in the form of oversized novelty homewares and popular characters. In fact, given the small crocheting as well as the adorable characters that get made, it’s a favourite of the team. 

Aran Crocheting

Aran Crocheting

Aran types of crocheting shouldn’t be confused with the Aran weight of yarn. While one refers to the twine used the other is one of the crochet patterns you should try out. It is known as a Celtic crochet style with an interlocking pattern with each stitch. You’ll recognise it in woolly hats and cosy blankets.

Bavarian Crocheting

Bavarian Crocheting

Bavarian crocheting is very unique among the different crochet stitches in this top-28. This is because the crochet rows form two layers in a diamond pattern. In a knit-and-purl- action two stitch types are used in conjunction that creates a 3D effect commonly seen in thick old-European blankets.

Bead Crocheting

Bead Crocheting

By the early 1800s, crochet as a hobby had travelled the globe. And a number of different crochet stitches – as well as varied crochet patterns – were developed along the way. Bead crochet was one of these. It was designed to be worn as a decorative feature on upper-class fashion items such as purses.

Bosnian Crocheting

Bosnian crocheting is often mistaken for a knitted fabric due to the closeness of the stitches. Interestingly, it’s also known as the Shepherd’s knit. It’s a slip stitch method where the slip stitch is worked into the front loop for a thicker fabric. For a traditional experience, you can buy authentic shepherd’s hooks!

Broomstick Crocheting

Broomstick Crocheting

Broomstick crocheting doesn’t automatically make you a witch, but it does make you a whiz at the crochet pastime. It is one of the vintage types of crocheting also called the Jiffy Lace. Used for delicate items such as shawls, it creates a unique design where you’ll likely never get the same results twice.

Bruges Crocheting

Bruges Crocheting

These types of crocheting almost do what they say on the tin. The Bruges crochet method is used to create the famous Bruges lace. Bruges lace is made by crocheting ribbons to form intricate patterns which are then used to embellish clothing or accessories. P.S. they’re French crochet patterns!

Bullion Crocheting

Bullion Crocheting

This is more of a specialist crochet stitch you don’t see as often as others. It is recognised by a unique roll formed by multiple wraps of yarn. They create the most inflexible pieces like decorative placemats and doilies. However, it probably isn’t best as crochet for beginners as it can be very intricate.

Celtic Crocheting

Celtic Crocheting

In contrast to the Aran crochet patterns, the Celtic crochet method is not a cable pattern. Instead, these types of crocheting form a double-row lattice that favours a square border. While it’s not the easiest of the different crochet stitches, it certainly makes for an interesting project you’ll have to share.

Clones Lace Crocheting

Clones Lace Crocheting

Clones Lace crocheting was discovered in Ireland (yes, another one with Irish roots) and was used for varied purposes. This crochet method was actually developed as a means of quickly and cheaply producing copies of Venetian laces, which is time consuming and made by needle point (hence the name).

Clothesline Crocheting

Clothesline Crocheting

Moving away from the luck of the Irish, this particular technique can be found in countries such as Africa. These types of crocheting are created when the traditional stitch is worked over a thick rope or twine structure to help hold its shape. With this, they’re often used to create beautiful wall hangings.

Cro-Hook Crocheting

Cro-Hook crocheting actually uses different types of crochet hooks: double-ended crocket hooks. This tool creates a double-sided crochet pattern meaning there is no front or back and both sides can be worked on. Ultimately, it gives a level of creative freedom not found with other crochet methods. 

Filet Crocheting

Filet Crocheting

Filet crocheting is a common type of crochet used to make kimonos and cushions. Crochet patterns of this type use a couple of different crochet stitches which form a grid-like pattern. This grid can then be a mix of filled squares, unfilled or negative. Newborn baby blankets are often made this way. 

Finger Crocheting

This is exactly what it sounds like; there is no need for a crochet hook (perfect when you lose it but still want to create!). These types of crocheting actually fall under the hand weaving family. While it doesn’t exactly yield to most tidy of results, it’s certainly a good project for recycling materials like string bags.

Freeform Crocheting

Freeform Crocheting

This is where you can let your hair down and go wild. The possibilities are as long as your piece of yarn. Freeform crochet is pattern-less giving the opportunity to play and combine different crochet stitches into one-time creations. But, to avoid surprises, you might want to stick to crochet patterns.

Granny Square Crocheting

Granny Square Crocheting

An ideal starting place in crochet for beginners, the Granny Square is so versatile. Once you’ve mastered the basic granny square technique, you can apply new techniques to change the design. Starting life as just a 4-step foundation chain, it can become any patch you set your mind to.

Hairpin Crocheting

Hairpin Crocheting

Back in the day, these techniques used metal hair pins giving these types of crocheting their name. Working with two rods holding the yarn taut, it creates a frilly appearance often mistaken for the Broomstick technique. Although, these crochet patterns can use regular types of crochet hooks.

Hyperbolic Crocheting

Hyperbolic Crocheting

Hyperbolic types of crocheting are an interesting one. Instead of being used for a clothing embellishment, the crochet patterns created with Hyperbolic stitches are often educational and artistic. This is because they ruffle in a coral-like fashion and are often crocheted for scrunchies or decoration!

Micro Crocheting

Micro Crocheting

Here’s another favourite among the team here at The Hobby Kraze. However, given the name, there’s no surprise to hear you may need to whip-out your magnifying glass. Much like Amigurumi, this modern style creates characters that require a steady head, the finest of threads and a good level of patience.

Overlay Crocheting

Overlay Crocheting

This technique is like an onion: there are lots of layers. Fundamentally, there is a base layer on which further layers build upon to create a raised pattern of intricate design. It’s another perfect example of crochet for beginners that allows you to experiment for wall hangings, potholders and so much more.

Pineapple Crocheting

Pineapple Crocheting

Popular in the 70’s, these types of crocheting were seen everywhere from home décor to clothing design. Yet, it isn’t really considered a technique; it’s more of a shape resembling a pineapple (hence the name) that is made through experimenting with adding and losing loops in a regular crochet stitch.

Spiral Crocheting

Spiral Crocheting

Another recognised Freeform crocheting technique, it’s created by continually joining separate rounds with a slipstitch. This joining of the rounds spirals to make a circular shape. It can be started using either the magic circle or a singular chain of stitches but is always a good method of crochet for beginners.

Stained Glass Crocheting

Stained Glass Crocheting

Similar in style to the Overlay technique, there are multiple layers. However, it differs in that many crochet creators out there will use a black yarn to create the recognisable stained-glass outline. It’s often seen as a decorative pattern on handbags, and we can’t get enough of it (despite not mastering it yet).

Symbol Crocheting

Symbol Crocheting

Symbol crocheting is very popular within Japanese pattern books. While it doesn’t create your usual crochet patterns, these types of crocheting aren’t the easiest stitches of crochet for beginners. But, if you can learn it, you’ll be able to start making projects from the charts alone! Pretty handy if you ask us! 

Tapestry Crocheting

Tapestry Crocheting

Also known as Intarsia crochet, these types of crocheting are known as the kind of colour and are usually featured within imagery-based designs (like Symbol crochet and Stained-Glass crochet). With so many different crochet stitches, Tapestry crocheting is a rewarding process of yielding new results. 

Tunisian Crocheting

Tunisian Crocheting

This type of crocheting works with slightly different types of crochet hooks. Typically, it’ll have a “stopper” on the end. In these types of crocheting, you work with loops on and off your hook, much like with knitting.  For this exact reason, Tunisian crochet often produces knit-look items such scarves.

Waffle Weave Crocheting

Waffle Weave Crocheting

This type of crochet is noticeable by name and by nature. As you compile the stitches in chains and rows, they come together into the very distinct shape of a waffle. Hence, the Waffle Weave. Every third stitch is a double crochet to form the waffle effect. It’s interesting how inspiring breakfast plate can be. 

Wire Crocheting

Wire Crocheting

Wire crocheting doesn’t actually refer to the types of crochet hooks you might use, the crochet patterns or even the different crochet stitches. It refers to the material you create crochet patterns with: metal wire. While not the most comfortable jumper or scarf, it’s often used for beaded necklaces or bracelets.

Conclusion

If you liked this article and found it useful in your crocheting adventure, don’t forget to share! Plus, if you do decide to go all-out with your yarn and the types of crochet hooks, take a snapshot and share your new crochet patterns with the team right here at The Hobby Kraze.

We’re all about the kraze of the hobby and where it’ll take you next!

Otherwise, if you decide to take a different direction with your yarn (or even thread) then you might want to look at our other guides written just for you by The Hobby Kraze team. We’ve got everything from garments made in the sewing machine to placemats made by two familiar knitting needles. Take a look:

  • A Comprehensive Guide to The Types of Sewing Machines
  • The Ultimate Beginners Guide to Cosplay
  • The Ultimate Guide to Knitting
  • The Ultimate Guide to Sewing
  • The Ultimate the Origami, Quilling and Paper Toys

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