Ultimate Review of the Best Loaded Longboards in 2021

Ultimate Review of the Best Loaded Longboards

Loaded Boards, the brainchild of Don Tashman, like long time running Sector 9 and Landyachtz, have been in the skate game for a while now and could be considered one of the longboarding classics.

Hustling through two decades now, this California-based company is now at the top of their game, producing some crowd-pleasing favorites for the longboard enthusiasts out there.

The brand has carved out an identity associated with longboard dancing, freestyling, and cruising. Loaded Lineup also has a selection of other boards for other longboarding styles.

But what makes Loaded longboards such a sensation?

Loaded boards aren’t all about hype; they deliver what they promise.

Besides the great price and awesome build, other Loaded lineup longboard’s key points worth every penny are durability, performance, fun, and ease of use.

This is not to mention the brand has an array of awesome boards you can pick from to suit your riding style.

Now, if you’re planning to jump into the fray and pick up one of these bad boys, our Loaded Longboards review will be more than just an asset to your game.

Our list is complete with a review of the five best Loaded boards in the marker. Plus, we’ve included a handy Loaded board buying guide that will arm you with everything you need to hit the jackpot.

Let’s get right into it, shall we?

Table of Contents

Quick Comparison Table!

Loaded Tesseract Basalt

4.8

4.8/5
Loaded Poke

4.6

4.6/5
Loaded Boards Dervish Sama

4.5

4.5/5
Loaded Boards Bhangra Bamboo

4.3

4.3/5
Loaded Boards Vanguard Bamboo

4.0

4/5

The Best Loaded Longboards For The Money

The Best Loaded Longboards For The Money

#1 Loaded Tesseract Basalt - Best for Downhill Riding

4.7/5
4.2/5
4.8/5

I must admit, the Loaded Tesseract Basalt had not always been my go-to board. But that changed once I gave it a try.

See, I had previously used a deck with similar concave to the Basalt and had a horrible experience.

So, going into this, I had my doubts and wasn’t sure if I would end up liking this longboard deck.

But as I mentioned earlier, everything changed once I took my first ride on the board.

What’s special about it?

Well, there’re numerous features to love on this board, and in the Loaded Tesseract longboard review below, I’ll break down to you why you should consider this Loaded board.

But first, let’s look at how Tesseract Basalt relates to other Loaded longboards.

Basalt is part of Loaded’s boards Tesseract series consisting of two other longboards; the Cantellated Tesseract and the Truncated Tesseract.

The Basalt is the full-sized pick of the Tesseract series, with a generous length of 39 inches.

While it looks big, it’s quite responsive as with all other Tesseract Loaded longboards and very trickable, thanks to the big kick tails, small wheelbase, and amazingly lightweight.

But how does it perform? Let’s find out.

Features and Benefits

Design

The first thing that stood out for me was the concave features.

These features make the deck feel intuitive and natural.  You’ll instantly know where your feet are on the deck, even without looking down.

The construction also feels solid, and even after curbing and falling, going at 30mph, it only nicked the tail.

Deck

The first thing I want to talk about the Basalt’s decks is durability. The durability is astounding.

At first, I was a little concerned about this because it’s made out of cork at the base layer.

Cork isn’t like the most standard material out there, but it has actually held up pretty well, surprisingly.

The bottom cork layer helps abrasive damage from spreading, and for the time I’ve spent with the board, the tail kicks aren’t even razor yet and still totally usable.

And as I mentioned, I curbed it hard and got away with only a nick. Curbing maple would have probably wrecked the board.

Additionally, the manufacturer claims cork offers a dampening effect to use the board in pretty darn conditions without feeling uncomfortable.

The next thing I want to talk about is concave.

I’m a big fan of the concave shape because it’s not super aggressive but basic and does what it needs to do.

The three things going for the deck’s concave are:

  • The rocker
  • Wheel flare
  • W Shape

The W shape is critical in providing more leverage and control of your board, while the slight rocker creates a nice secure grip tape for your feet when riding without overly locking them.

On the other hand, the big flared wheel wells create a special foam in the board contours, allowing your feet to dig in the board nicely.

Your back foot will feel completely at home, and though the deck is a top mount, my back foot feels like it’s sitting in a drop.

They’re nice components when riding fast as they offer a helpful reference point for positioning wheels when riding without having to look down.

Performance

The Loaded Tesseract longboard is designed for freeride and high speeds.

While the concave isn’t as obvious or as aggressive, it’s quite effective at securing your feet when riding fast and offering all the support you need for your foot arches for better grip.

The raised wheel flares are also critical for extra comfort when sliding or bombing wheels.

Finally, the progressive W shape makes this board a worthy option for downhill/racing boards.

Wheels & Trucks

Basalt board features multiple wheelbase options as the Loaded Overland; you can mount the trucks nearer or further apart depending on your riding preference.

I recommend setting them further closer as it’s closer to your feet, giving you the most downward force, and that way, it matches up the wheel to the wheel flares as much as possible.

The other essential aspect I loved with the board is the 75MM, 80A Orangatang wheels that will roll just about on anything while offering good grip tape and smoothness.

On the other hand, the Paris 180mm wheel trucks deliver a smooth and controlled tight turning response, perfect for carving and freeride longboarding.

Pros

Cons

#2 Loaded Poke - City Cruiser

4.6/5
4.3/5
4.6/5

Loaded define this little board as an urban explorer. It’s designed for the agility and lightness of an all-around city cruiser.

The Loaded Poke, pronounced as poke-eh, is an incredible longboard for cruising in town, especially in the tight corners, manoeuvring around human traffic, and avoiding obstacles.

But how does it perform? And is it the right Loaded longboard for you?

Let’s find out.

Features and Benefits

Design

Loaded Poke Longboard is among the smaller boards we’ve come on our list of the best Loaded longboards review.

As you would expect, it’s super-lightweight and compact enough to stash and carry in your backpack.

Aside from a compact design, Poke has a lot going on it in terms of aesthetics.

The bamboo veneer at the top looks great, and so does the fish art on the bottom.

Overall, the Loaded Poke Longboard is awesome, and if you need an option that rides nice as it looks, you can’t go wrong with this deck.

Deck

With a modest length of 34″, Loaded Poke Longboard is about the length of a regular street deck but much wider (9.125″).

While it may not be a great pick for beginners chasing for a stable board, it’s a good choice if you’re a street skater looking for something comfortable for cruising and commuting.

It’s also an awesome choice for a longboard city rider who needs a small, maneuverable, and easy-to-stow board.

Away from the width, another signature feature that makes this board suitable for cruising is the 20.75” wheelbase.

The longer wheelbase improves the overall stability at higher cruising speed and allows bigger wheels, leading to a more comfortable ride.

While it’s not the most stable unit, it’s better in terms of comfort and balance than other street decks of a similar size.

Performance

Poke is a great city cruiser, but it excels as an agile longboard for city carving and pumping.

What makes the Poke stand out is its combination of rocker, concave, and flex.

The wide, rockered deck lowers the middle section of the board, making it comfortable to push travel on, while the subtle flex provides a slight rebound when you kick.

However, the deck still feels rigid, but when you combine this with the large wheel flare kicks, it makes the board apt for freestyle tricks, bowl riding, and quick slide.

With the right setup, Poke is amazingly pumpable and surfy.

Finally, we’ve the concave, a mellow concave that doesn’t get in the way of moving around when performing tricks.

More importantly, it securely locks your feet, and this is handy when deep carving or pumping.

Wheels & Trucks

On the Loaded Poke, you’re given the option of picking your choice of trucks and wheels to mount on the deck.

The manufacture, however, recommends two predefined setups that work well depending on your style of riding,

The first choice is the carver trucks that give the board a surfy feel. The front trucks are more turny than the back, so it’s easy to pump and carve the board like crazy.

The second option is the Paris Truck build that offers a more traditional longboard carving feel. This setup is stable at speed and feels more normal in turns.

Pros

Cons

#3 Loaded Boards Dervish Sama - King of All-Rounders

4.4/5
4.5/5
4.5/5

The Dervish Sama is one of Loaded’s longest-standing and best-selling longboards.

It’s a popular option in the longboarding community, and for reasons I’ll explain later, it’s a jack of all trade board similar to the Loaded boards Tan Tien.

From freestyling, dancing to freeriding, the Loaded Dervish Sama is perfectly suited for various longboarding disciplines.

But how good is this board?

Let’s find out.

Features and Benefits

Design

Loaded is among the best longboard manufacturers, and this is evident on the Sama Longboard.

Everything on this best Loaded board has a touch of sophistication, artistry, and quality.

It’s a really fun and great board that inspires easy movement and not as stiff or rigid as maple Loaded boards.

The flex is a bit harder than the Loaded Vanguard, but this helps with the versatility as the board is suitable for different styles.

And, oh, the deck is ultra-light compared to maple Loaded longboards, so easy to carry. Bonus!

Deck

The loaded Sama deck has a lot going for it.

Let’s start with the dimensions.

It’s among the largest Loaded longboards, coming in at a length of 42 inches and 9 inches deck.

The large board has a whole lot of standing platform and will permit a whole lot of space-intensive styles such as cross-stepping, board walking, spinning, dancing, and pirouette tricks.

While you might think it’s a bulky board, the choice of materials makes the board manageable, even for beginners.

As with most of the Loaded Longboards, Sama is constructed from a vertically laminated core sandwich between two sheets of triaxial fibreglass.

While the material combo isn’t as sturdy as the cork we saw on the Tesseract; it can take a beating like a champ.

The material doesn’t break or chip even when rammed against a curb or even run over by automobiles.

But sturdiness isn’t the only benefit the material brings to the table.

It’s incredibly flexible.

The board has an energetic flex, which is useful for carving and pumping as the deck loads up and springs out in a super responsive way.

Even better, the deck is available in three flex options, so you can always find a flex option suiting your preferences.

In general, the softer flex is more suitable for cruising and dancing.

Flex 2, or the medium flex, is ideal for a mix of bombing hills, dancing, and performing tricks, while the stiff flex deck is suitable for fast downhill and hard tricks.

Performance

As we mentioned in the intro, Dervish Sama is an all-rounder longboard, excelling in different longboarding disciplines.

It comes with a drop-through deck, and when combined with a large deck, it makes the board quite comfortable for commutes. The drop-down design lowers the deck, allowing for easy and effective pushing.

The large deck also makes the Sama an inspiring option for exploring styles such as longboard dancing and footstep combos.

With such a large deck, you’re less likely to miss your footing when dancing.

Finally, Sama’s flexy board construction and a huge wheel clearance are bliss for riders chasing a board with a snowboard-like carving feel.

The cambered deck allows the board to spring back up when flexed, resulting in the lively and energetic surfy feel.

Wheels & Trucks

Sama’s large wheel cutouts can accommodate 70 to 80mm wheels without causing any wheel bite.

The board’s wheels offer a fast roll and will take on the obstacles well. They’re also smooth and will absorb any shock for a comfortable ride.

On the other hand, the 180mm, 50° reverse-kingpin trucks enhance the Sama’s turning agility, manoeuvrability, and overall control.

Pros

Cons

#4 Loaded Boards Bhangra Bamboo - Best Loaded Board for Dancing

4.3/5
4.5/5
4.3/5

If you thought the Dervish Sama was a big board, you’ve not met the Loaded Bhangra V2 Bamboo deck.

This thing is a monster.

At nearly 49 inches in length, I don’t think longboards can get any longer than this.

And yet, the length doesn’t compromise on the board’s performance.

Of course, The Loaded Bhangra can’t be used for tricks or carving, but it’s an excellent cruising and dancing board.

Features and Benefits

Design

Bhangra is a Loaded board, so, yeah, it rides great.

The quality is clearly outstanding from the second you jump on the longboard.

Very sturdy but built with enough flex that you can move and glide effortlessly.

The trucks and wheel seem sturdy, and the eco-friendly build of the board was a big selling point for me.

Deck

The first impression of this dancing board is the large deck.

Bhangra has a spacious deck platform, and there’s more than enough room to move around.

While the size of the deck can be intimidating to beginners, you’ll feel confident using the board as soon as you step on it.

The large deck isn’t the only selling point for me.

I love the choice of material on the Bhangra.

According to Loaded, Bhangra uses updated Basalt and bio-epoxy construction for a lighter weight, damp flex, and continued eco-friendliness.

The board is indestructible, and the nose and tail ends don’t splinter in different pieces as a regular plywood board does.

Another exciting feature we love is the rocked profile.

While it’s not as pronounced, it’s effective at cradling your stance for comfortable dancing, advanced freestyle tricks, and general riding.

The mild concave offers edge control without interfering with your footwork, while the large nose and tail with aggressive grip tape encourage tricks,

Performance

While the Bhangra is a wonderful pick for commuting and freeriding, it excels most for dancing.

Most riders agree Bhangra is a sweet board, especially when it comes to dancing.

At 48.5”, this performance longboard is long enough for dancing and footsteps. Yet, it’s nimble enough for the freestyle tricks.

Plus, its smooth ride and unique triple flex make it a great option for cruising.

But it has one major caveat: weight.

Bhangra is a heavy board, and for long-distance cruising, it may prove a bit challenging for effective use.

Wheels & Trucks

Bhangra features 180mm Paris V2 trucks, which are amazingly responsive and strong. They’ll handle anything you throw at them while allowing for greater turnability.

Large 70MM Orangatang wheels complete the setup. These high-quality wheels are made from quality urethane and will deliver a fast and smooth-rolling experience on any terrain.

Pros

Cons

#5 Loaded Boards Vanguard Bamboo - Best for Hard Carving

4.2/5
4.6/5
4/5

The Vanguard is an important asset in Loaded’s impressive lineup.

This board is positioned as a snowboard-style flexy top-mounted deck, primarily designed for hard carving.

But unlike the Loaded Icarus, the Loaded Vanguard isn’t only a carving machine, but it’s versatile, and some riders use this board for pumping and commuting.

Features and Benefits

Design

First off, the stock photos don’t do this beautiful board justice.

The Orangatang high-quality wheels with the black on the gold Paris trucks look fantastic and will definitely get heads turning.

Plus, the board assembly is spot on and super easy.

As for the board itself, you’ll love how it turns like butter and how the wheels eat the cracks and rough spots for breakfast.

But with many decks flexes available, getting used to the board might feel weird at first; it feels like getting used to a trampoline with wheels in it.

But once you get the hang of it, you’ll carve in no time.

Deck

Loaded Vanguard sports a symmetrical top mount shape and come in two lengths of 38″ or 42″. Both options have a standard width of 8.5″, which I feel is slightly narrow, especially compared to other symmetrical cutouts.

Depending on your riding proficiency, you can go with either option. But I would recommend beginners to pick the 42″ board as it’s more stable.

The deck has a hybrid board construction, consisting of vertically-laminated bamboo and fibreglass construction.

It’s a nice combination of materials as it’s not only durable, but it can absorb the shock from rough terrain.

As for the shape, Loaded Vanguard truly reminds me of snowboarding, which is what the board is modelled after.

It sports a cambered top mount platform with big wheel cutouts. As we shall see later, the design makes the Vanguard apt for deep carves while eliminating the risk of a wheel bite.

Performance

The Vanguard will impress you with its responsiveness the moment you step on it.

First, the flex is so bouncy that you’ll feel as if you’re on a trampoline. This is useful for the extreme carves and slashy pumps.

Yet, even on the flexier versions, the energetic bounce is forgiving, though I wouldn’t recommend using the flex 5 version for bombing hills or riding fast.

Of course, the carving experience depends on the amount of flex you choose, and fortunately, this board has up to 5 multiple flex options.

I love the flex 3 deck as it allows for smooth and responsive board carves that work well with the Orangatang wheels and Paris trucks,

Wheels & Trucks

Similar to the Poke, Vanguard provides the option of two setups for the board.

Loaded recommends the “carving and pumping” and the “Monster truck.” But you can always go for customized configuration.

The Craving setup focuses on fluid and fast smooth carving, while the Monster Truck includes huge 85mm wheels for fast and smooth riding.

Pros

Cons

Best Loaded Longboards Buying Guide

Best Loaded Longboards Buying Guide

Often, many longboarders think that the best Loaded longboards are the one that is most strong and durable.

But there’s actually a lot more than just durability and strength.

There’re a host of other features that determine whether a longboard is suited for you.

And in the section below, we’ll look at the critical elements.

What to Look for Before Buying Loaded Longboard Decks?

Fit for your Style?

The first thing to consider when buying a Loaded board is your riding style.

Do you need a Loaded board for freestyling, free riding, cruising around, carving, sliding, or bombing hills?

It gets easier for you to choose a longboard best suited for your needs by determining your style.

And fortunately, Loaded has a wide array of options to suit your every riding discipline.

Longevity

We all love a bang for the buck, right?

But how do you ensure that your longboard will give you the service you’re paying for.

Here’s where the brand and durability of construction comes into play.

Fortunately, you don’t have to worry about Loaded longboards durability.

All the Loaded boards are built with sturdiness in mind and will take a beating without compromising their integrity.

Weight

Portability is essential when getting any longboard.

After all, it’s pretty uncomfortable to whip up moves if your choice of board is challenging to carry and hold onto.

On the flip side, don’t get a lightweight longboard that can’t support your weight.

The trick here is balancing between the two.

Get a longboard that is easy to carry, while at the same time, a board that can accommodate your weight without bottoming down or breaking. The latter is particularly true for the heavy riders.

Mount Type

We’re not going to start another epi debate over what’s the best mount type for your longboard.

It all depends on what you want on a longboard and your preferred riding style.

For instance, the drop mounts are ideal picks for riders who’re chasing for stability and those who want to rack up miles effortlessly.

On the other hand, the top mounts are best suited for riders looking for greater responsiveness and control. These Loaded longboards with higher ride height are ideal for carving enthusiasts.

Board Size

There’s not a universal right board size.

As with any other longboard element, it all depends on what you need in a board and your riding style.

Generally, the shorter Loaded longboards are more portable, while the longer Loaded decks are stable.

In most cases, choosing any size means you’ve to live with certain compromises.

For instance, the larger Loaded boards are stable but bulky. The shorter boards are more maneuverable but unstable.

If you’re undecided, I would suggest that you pick the mid-sized options that give you the best of both worlds.

Board Shape

Generally, there’re two Loaded decks options available- directional and symmetrical shape.

The symmetrical Loaded boards allow you to switch quickly and easily as they’ve a nose and kicktail. They’re best suited for freestyle and dance.

On the other hand, if you want a longboard for commuting, I recommend the directional shapes as they’re better suited for speed and stability.

Flex Options

Board flex is necessary when choosing a longboard.

It affects how your board feels and fits your riding style.

For example, Loaded boards with more flex offer more rebound when carving, and this can make your turning more efficient.

Flexy Loaded boards are also better at absorbing shocks and thus can offer a pleasant and smooth tide.

On the flip side, too much flex compromises the stability at high speeds and makes it harder to perform freestyle kicks and flicks.

Price Point

Loaded is a premium brand, and as you would expect, their boards come at premium prices.

But this shouldn’t be a complaint when you’re getting something super high quality and performance-oriented.

Still, if you’re looking for a Loaded board on a budget, you can get something really good.

The trick is getting a deck best suited for your riding styles and ditching whatever is extra on, not your priority.

Best Loaded Longboard Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Q: What is the best Loaded longboard?

A: There’s no best Loaded longboard. It all depends on what you need on a board. Loaded has an array of awesome boards to suit the different riding styles.

Q: Are Loaded Longboards worth it?

A: Yes. For a long time, Loaded Longboards has been at the forefront, producing quality, reliable and performance-oriented boards.

Q: What Loaded longboards do professionals use?

A: Most professionals use Loaded twin longboards because their stability is high. These boards allow riders to make sharp turns and cuts with ease and may be ideal for downhill use.

Wrap Up: Our Choice

Best Loaded Longboards Wrap Up Our Choice

Choosing the winner from our list of the best Loaded longboards review was challenging as all the boards here are reliably made and perfect in their own right.

But we feel the Loaded Tesseract Basalt has the edge over the rest.

While it’s best suited for downhill riding, it also excels in other riding disciplines. More importantly, it’s reliable and won’t fail to take you from one location to another.

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